7 MOUSE PHENOTYPE RESOURCES


If you are interested in mouse phenotypes, you’ll have noticed that there are a wealth of resources available. Here’s our round-up of some of the best databases out there. Did we miss your favourite? Let us know by contacting us on Twitter @dmdduk.


Mouse Genome Informatics

 

 

 

 

 

 

Almost everyone will be familiar with this one, but no list of mouse resources would be complete without the MGI database. It covers gene characterisation, nomenclature, phenotypes, gene expression and tumour biology amongst many other datasets.

Use this resource: for a broad picture of mouse genetics. www.informatics.jax.org


Facebase

 

 

 

 

Around half of all birth defects involve the face, but in many cases the reason they occur remains unknown. The Facebase resource aims to tackle this problem with their database of head, skull and craniofacial data. The first five-year phase concentrated on the middle of the human face and the genetics of disorders such as cleft lip and palate. The second phase (which is currently underway) will expand Facebase to include other regions of the face, as well as developing new online search and analysis tools for the data.

Use this resource: if you’re specifically interested in craniofacial phenotypes. www.facebase.org


Monarch

 

 

 

 

The Monarch resource allows cross-species comparison of phenotype data without the user having detailed knowledge of each species’ genetics, development, anatomy, or the terminology used to describe it. The database contains phenotype data for many species including human, mouse, zebrafish and flies, which has been gathered from other dedicated phenotyping projects. The tools developed by Monarch allow users to explore phenotypic similarity between species and are intended to facilitate the identification of animal models of human disease.

Use this resource: to compare mouse phenotype data with phenotypes from many other species. www.monarchinitiative.org


Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders

DMDD LOGO

 

The DMDD database contains high-resolution images and detailed whole-embryo phenotype data for embryonic lethal knockout mouse lines. The High Resolution Episcopic Microscopy technique used for imaging allows phenotypes to be identified down to the level of abnormal positioning or morphology of individual nerves and blood vessels. Parallel screens identify placental phenotypes and carry out whole-embryo gene expression profiling, with all data freely available online. Around 80 lines have been phenotyped to date, with new data added regularly.

Use this resource: for whole-embryo images and phenotype datasets – primary screen data at an unprecedented level of detail. dmdd.org.uk


International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium

 

 

 

 

The IMPC has the ambitious goal of phenotyping knockout mice for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. For adult mice, the project provides primary screen data for all the major organ systems, and for many embryonic lethal lines there is also embryo data available. With nearly 6000 lines already analysed, there’s an enormous amount of data to explore.

Use this resource: to access phenotype data for a huge number of knockout mouse lines. www.mousephenotype.org


Origins of Bone and Cartilage Disease

 

 

 

OBCD is a collaboration working to identify the genetic causes of bone and cartilage disease – an important goal when you consider that around half of adults are affected by a bone or cartilage disorder. OBCD aims to phenotype mice from 1750 different knockout lines, and they have made a heatmap of their data freely available online. With nearly 500 lines phenotyped so far, there’s already a huge amount of data and much more to come.

Use this resource: if you’re specifically interested in phenotypes related to the bones and joints. www.boneandcartilage.com


eMouseAtlas

 

 

 

 

Last but not least, if you’re interested in mouse phenotypes you will probably also need information about normal mouse development. The eMouseAtlas resource provides 3D computer models of the developing mouse, covering everything from gross anatomy to detailed structure. It’s a useful point of comparison for phenotypes that have been observed in mutant mouse strains. As a nice project they have also re-digitised the original histological sections from Kaufman’s definitive book ‘The Atlas of Mouse Development‘, making the images available online in high resolution for the first time, together with their original annotations.

Use this resource: for a detailed description of normal mouse embryo morphology at any stage of development. www.emouseatlas.org

 

Tweet us if we missed your favourite database @dmdduk.

Cover image by Rama (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.0 fr], via Wikimedia Commons.